This series is a reflection of my experiences in architecture from my childhood, where I was observing the built environment without paying attention to it.

I started experiencing architecture much before I could realize it…

Having spend my childhood in government bungalows of British era, I never paid any attention to the details inside…Surprisingly, I remember quite a lot of them…Dining room, a very dull and boring room had suddenly become the key place of
interest.
my father had replaced a panel of false ceiling with glass panel and the pitch roof over the glass panel with plastic sheet…and
for hours together I’d watch cat and her kittens playing over that glass panel…I started studying in dining table…I watched the cat feed her babies- there were bones over that glass panel…and I wondered what all would I discover if I go up there…

I started experiencing architecture much before I could realize it…
I started learning it little later…

 

My first experience of bunking the class was through window…As a student of sixth standard, I never realized that I could do it only because the windows had no grills…I didn’t think what difference would it make if grills were there…

 

I first thought of scale when a new wash basin was being installed in my house…and my mother was asking my father “what height should it be fixed?” immediately I replied, “we must consider mummy’s height…because we kids will grow in height and mom will be shortest in the family.”

They smiled and accepted…

I started experiencing architecture much before I could realize it…I only started learning it little later…

 

When I was in second grade, a construction site near my home was a play field…We played hide-and-seek in the trenches dug for foundation and then in the superstructure…we jumped from chajja to the sand below…in the sand we made human dummies…climbed on the heap of stones and ran down in speed…We celebrated construction…

A family had come to live in the house. My sister, in a party, went straight to the owner of the house… “When there were trenches, when there were walls and even when came the roof- we all were happy…why did you move in?”

I am amazed, how differently I experience construction, as six-year-old kid, and as a young architect.